Aust doco on Dalai Lama looks for buyers

15 October, 2008 by IF

[Release by The Tibet Project]

A new Australian documentary Tibet’s Cry for Freedom is particularly timely with the Dalai Lama calling an emergency meeting in November to review the Tibetan freedom struggle. As well as providing a snapshot of Tibetan contemporary history since the Chinese occupation, this documentary explores human rights abuses, what it means to be a refugee and the debate between the Dalai Lama’s Middle Way Policy versus the radicals calling for Independence. The documentary includes stills photographs of the Nangpa La Pass shooting of Tibetan refugees provided by Czech mountaineer Pavle Kozjek who was recently killed while climbing the Karakoram.

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Produced and directed by first time filmmaker Lara Damiani, the documentary has been narrated by Australian actress Kerry Armstrong and features exclusive interviews with the Dalai Lama, the Tibetan Prime Minister in exile, Chinese dissident Wei Jingsheng and many others.

The 52 minute documentary was purchased recently by TV New Zealand and Damiani is currently in MIPCOM in Cannes, France on the lookout for other broadcasters interested in acquiring the rights to screen the documentary.

It has screened at film festivals in France and Finland and will screen later this month in the USA.

The documentary was filmed over 12 months in India, Australia, Beijing and secretly inside Tibet last year where Damiani was stopped and questioned for filming by Chinese military. Later, while filming in Tiananmen Square, Damiani was followed closely by Chinese police vehicles. The documentary is first time Director/Producer Lara Damiani’s attempt to raise awareness of the Tibetan freedom struggle and was independently produced and funded.

Inspired by the plight of Tibet and the Tibetans, first time filmmaker Damiani quit her job and funded the documentary with personal cash reserves, bank loans and credit cards. She sold clothes and furniture to keep the project going. Post production was stalled earlier this year until a generous donation was made by a couple from Sydney who are supporters of Tibet. Damiani, and most of the people who have helped in the making of this documentary, have never been paid.

“Without the generous support and contribution of so many people who really believe in the Tibetan freedom struggle, this project would not have been possible” says Damiani. “It’s evidence of what can be achieved when people who really believe in something come together to make it happen. It’s also a sign of the support for the ideals of freedom, peace, truth and justice.”

In Australia, DVD’s are now available for purchase online at www.tibetscryforfreedom.com and Damiani has plans to extend avenues of distribution when she comes back to Australia.

For more information, visit www.tibetscryforfreedom.com

To watch Australian television stories on Lara Damiani and The Tibet Project: www.todaytonightadelaide.com.au
Type in “The Tibet Documentary” in the left hand side search box

 

 

 

 

 

 

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