NFSA wins four awards

24 October, 2011 by IF

Press release from National Film and Sound Archive

The National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA) has won four Australian Society of Archivists’ Mander Jones Awards presented at the 15th annual Australian Society of Archivists conference, held last week.

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“We are honoured and delighted to receive these Awards, and applaud the Australian Society of Archivists for running an award program that raises the bar for archival writing and publishing in Australia”, said NFSA Chief Executive Officer, Michael Loebenstein.

The winning submissions For best publication that uses, features or interprets Australian archives, written by or on behalf of a corporate body:

o Marius Sestier Collection – Scholarly essay by Sally Jackson, International Film Specialist
o Restoring For the Term of his Natural Life – Scholarly essay by Graham Shirley, NFSA Historian

For best finding aid to an archival collection held by an Australian institution or about Australia:

o Sounds of Australia Registry – A media rich, online gateway to Australia’s historic and contemporary sound works as nominated by the public each year since 2007. Matthew Davies, Senior Curator, Sound, Broadcast and New Media
o Wireless House – NFSA’s partnership with the City of Sydney and sonic artist Nigel Helyer to reactivate the Wireless House, built in Foley Park, Glebe in 1934, as a public listening space. A unique and innovative presentation of over 200 sound works from the national audiovisual collection that connects the collection with the community to be experienced in an original manner and context. Matthew Davies, Senior Curator, Sound, Broadcast and New Media

A list of award categories is available here.

The Mander Jones awards were established in 1996 by the Australian Society of Archivists to reward publications in the field of recordkeeping and archives. The awards are named in honour of Phyllis Mander Jones who authored manuscripts in the British Isles relating to Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific, in 1972.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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