Screen NSW has introduced a target to achieve an average 50/50 gender equity in its development and production funding programs by 2020. 

 

Effective immediately, the target will see Screen NSW work towards reducing the industry wide gender bias against women in key creative roles.

 

Internationally the screen industry has far fewer women than men in the key creative roles of Director, Writer and Producer.  


The Australian screen scene is no different, with Screen Australia-funded dramatic features across a 5-year average (2009-2014) reporting female directors 15 per cent, producers 32 per cent and writers 23 per cent.  


Screen NSW features funded for production over the 3-year period 2012/13 – 2014/15, showed female Producers at 75 per cent, Directors 28 per cent and Writers 16 per cent.

 

It is hoped Screen NSW funding programs for development and production will encourage applicants to demonstrate active engagement of women in key creative roles. 


Screen NSW will continue to deliver on Government priorities and to assess all applications against published criteria to identify the best projects based on merit.

 

Screen NSW CEO Courtney Gibson said it was an equity issue, of course. 


"But for Screen NSW, it’s principally about supporting and enabling the very best work," she said. 


"And if females are so poorly represented, it means that we, as an industry, aren't exploiting all we have to offer. 


"The long game of this target is, for us, about leveling the playing field to ensure that women get the same opportunities as men and that the strongest work gets supported. 


"And it can't be achieved unless we just decide that we're going to do something about it.

 

“Having a target will force us to continually ask, are we supporting an industry which is giving women the same kinds of opportunities it gives men? And if we’re not, where are the gaps, where are the opportunities, and how can we work together as an industry to maximise them?"

 

Underpinning the target, Screen NSW, through its Industry Development Program, will encourage eligible applicants to develop projects that provide professional development opportunities to women in the film and television sector.

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2 Comments

  1. “female Producers at 75%”

    Cool, so is this policy going to be egalitarian?
    We’ll need to get more male producers, if that’s the case.

    This will just all lead to worse films, and the death of meritism. Say goodbye to the audience, guys. GG.

  2. “Screen Australia-funded dramatic features across a 5-year average (2009-2014) reporting female directors 15 per cent, producers 32 per cent and writers 23 per cent”

    Cool, so do these statistics include the producers offset? Because that’s not a screen Australia funding decision. That’s private enterprise applying for a tax break, and getting waved through. So it’s going to look much more like the commercial stats.

    Are these statistics fudged to make offset films look like films Screen Aus actually financially backed outside a TAX BREAK? Because the funding that’s injected in to female directors and producers already is probably much higher.

    Take your socialism somewhere else please. Good bye meritism.

    Understand the problem, then use a surgical knife. Not a nuke that will decimate the audience in the process. You can’t have it both ways. Either you pick the best story, our your use the blunt instrument you’ve just implemented.

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